India to enhance border security (to install hi-tech gadgets)

information

In order to secure a 60-km stretch and riverine border with Bangladesh in Assam’s Dhubri district, the Home Ministry has arranged for sonar cameras, radars, aerostat and electro-optic underground sensors. Falling under the comprehensive integrated border management system, the project—which is on a pilot base—aims to [completely] replace physical security mechanism with a technical set up to enhance security.

The stretch on the riverine border across the Brahmaputra river was unguarded in the most primitive manner, leaving it open for easy invasion. To detect any kind of intrusion, the Border Security Force (BSF) was thoroughly relying on CCTV surveillance. This lead to uplift the security around the border. Besides, the ministry has also identified more vulnerable areas along 2,400 km long borders with Pakistan and Bangladesh, where this pilot project will commence in the next phase.

An official of the Home Ministry confirmed that the idea is to ensure a 24x7 security without any scope of error. “The need of the hour is to secure our borders through the use of technology and develop a forward-looking strategy. Securing the borders physically will always have its limitations. So we decided to make the shift,” added the official.

As per the sources, the new equipment is already in place at the border and the pilot project will begin once it has been inaugurated by Rajnath Singh, Union Home Minister, in the coming month.

While the sonar cameras will detect for any underwater threats approaching the Indian border from under the river, the radars and the aerostats will keep a vigil in the area. Besides, to detect underground threats, electro-optic sensors that run 20-feet deep will be used.

The technology is so advanced that it can even detect the movement of a tiny fish and can be seen on the projectors in the control room, the official informed. After competitive tenders, the technology has been purchased from a European company. Meanwhile, experts have been called in to train the BSF personnel to use it.